Workshop Chairs
Bryan Hannegan
Maxine Savitz
Quin Shea

Committee Members

Power Generation
Eric Holdsworth
Industrial Generation
Ed Rightor
Brad Upton
Hector Ybanez

Distributed Sources
John Miranowksi

Cross-cutting Issues
Robert Marlay
Neal Elliott


Scripps Seaside Forum
8610 Kennel Way (formerly Discovery Way)
La Jolla, CA 92037
Website



Workshop Steering Committee and Speakers

James H. Butler

James H. Butler

Director, Global Monitoring Division, NOAA Earth System Research Laboratory (NOAA/ESRL)
Steering Committee, Global Monitoring

Jim Butler is Director of the Global Monitoring Division at NOAA/ESRL in Boulder, Colorado, where he has conducted research on climate forcing and ozone depletion for 25 years. In his current capacity, he oversees the nation’s continuing measurements of atmospheric constituents that affect the world’s climate, including carbon dioxide and other greenhouse gases, ozone-depleting gases, aerosols, and surface radiation. Dr. Butler’s published works address the distribution and cycling of gases in the atmosphere, their production and consumption by the ocean, their exchange across the air-sea interface, their distribution in polar snow, and methods for their analysis. He is a regular contributor to international documents on global warming, stratospheric ozone depletion, and atmospheric chemistry. Before coming to NOAA, Dr. Butler was a research scientist at the University of Colorado, an instructor at Humboldt State University, and a project manager at Environmental Research Consultants in California.

He received his PhD in Chemical Oceanography from Oregon State University, an M.S. from Humboldt State University, and a B.A. from UC Santa Barbara.

Kenneth J. Davis

Kenneth J. Davis

Professor of Meteorology, The Pennsylvania State University, and Director, Northeastern Regional Center, National Institute for Climatic Change Research of the U.S. Department of Energy
Breakout Session Chair, Distributed Sources and Sinks

Kenneth Davis has been actively involved in climate change research since the late 1980s. In addition to his role as Meteorology Professor at Penn State and Director of DOE’s regional climate change research institute, he co-chairs the North American Carbon Program Science Steering Group. His climate research is focused on earth-atmosphere Interaction, i.e., how the earth's surface interacts with the atmosphere. His research group observes: trace gas fluxes using anemometers and gas analyzers mounted on towers and aircraft; atmospheric turbulence using ground-based and airborne LIDAR (a laser version of a radar); and soil and vegetation conditions using satellites. They hope to determine which environmental factors will govern future concentrations of atmospheric carbon dioxide, and how ecosystem processes interact with boundary layer turbulence to alter climate and weather.

Prior to joining the Penn State faculty, Dr. Davis was an Assistant Professor at the University of Minnesota and held various research positions, including several with the National Center for Atmospheric Research. His undergraduate studies were completed at Princeton University, and he holds a Ph.D. in Astrophysical, Planetary, and Atmospheric Sciences from the University of Colorado.

Charles Dene

Manager, Air Emission Monitoring & Control (CEMS, IEC, SO2), in the Generation Sector at the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI)
Speaker, Power Generation

Charles Dene is responsible for the emissions monitoring, including the development of advanced continuous emission monitoring equipment, and related emissions monitoring issues such as mercury measurements, enhanced monitoring protocols, and continuous monitors for hazardous air pollutants.  Other duties include the evaluation and development of integrated emissions control technologies for fossil fuel generating plants, including the impacts of SCR on Hg control technologies and advanced FGD designs.  Past projects have included evaluations of the J-Power ReACT and Powerspan ECO™ processes.

After joining EPRI in 1978, Dene provided on-site direction for EPRI Pilot Plant studies at the Shawnee Test Facility in Paducah, Kentucky.  Dene directed the site selection, design and construction of EPRI’s Environmental Control Technology Center (ECTC) in Barker NY.  Previously, Dene directed the operations of EPA FGD pilot units EPA facilities in RTP, NC.  He also served on the start-up team of a full scale FGD system while employed at Detroit Edison.

Dene received BS in Chemical Engineering from Wayne State University in 1972.  He is a member of the American Institute of Chemical Engineers, the Air and Waste Management Association, and ASTM International.

Riley Duren

Riley Duren

Chief Systems Engineer, Earth Science & Technology Directorate, NASA Jet Propulsion Laboratory
Speaker, Integrating Observations and Inventories to Improve Emission Estimates: A Framework for Global Synthesis

Riley Duren is chief systems engineer for the Earth Science and Technology Directorate at NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL). He has 22 years experience delivering observational systems for the U.S. and international science community and is a veteran of seven successful satellite missions including earth-mapping radars and space telescopes, for which he received NASA’s System Engineering Award and two Exceptional Achievement Medals. He was the Chief Engineer for the Kepler Mission now conducting a search for earth-size planets around other stars. He has lectured and written about Verification and Validation of complex systems including a textbook chapter on the subject.  He has given invited talks on applied systems engineering in various forums including those sponsored by INCOSE and the NAE.

His current duties alternate between providing tactical engineering support for JPL’s earth observing missions and strategic analysis and design of decision support systems for climate change mitigation and adaptation.   Since 2008, he has served as one of the leaders of a grass-roots collaboration between multiple U.S. agencies and international partners to study existing capabilities, notional requirements, and architectural options for deploying a policy-relevant global greenhouse gas monitoring and information system. He has co-organized 7 interagency meetings, workshops, and conference sessions on this topic.

Charles Elachi

Charles Elachi

Director, Jet Propulsion Laboratory, National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA JPL)
Steering Committee, Global Monitoring

Dr. Elachi is JPL Director and Vice President of the California Institute of Technology. He joined JPL in 1970 and has been a principal investigator on a number of research and development studies and flight projects sponsored by the NASA, including the Shuttle Imaging Radar series (Science Team Leader), the Magellan Imaging Radar (Team Member), and the Cassini Titan Radar (Team Leader). He is the author of over 230 publications in the fields of active microwave remote sensing and electromagnetic theory, and he holds several patents in those fields. He taught "physics of remote sensing" at the California Institute of Technology from 1982 to 2001. In 1989, Dr. Elachi was elected to the National Academy of Engineering and has served on a number of academy committees and in 2006, he was selected as one of America's Best Leaders by U.S. News & World Report and the Center for Public Leadership at Harvard University's Kennedy School of Government.

Dr. Elachi has chaired a number of strategic planning committees for NASA. He has lectured in more than 20 countries about space exploration and Earth observation. He participated in a number of archeological expeditions in Egypt, Oman and China. He is the chair of the UCLA Sciences Board of Visitors, a member of the Huntington Hospital Board of Trustees (Pasadena), the chair of the Lebanese American University Board of Trustees (New York/Beirut) and a member of the International Advisory Board of King Fahd University of Petroleum and Minerals (Saudi Arabia). He was a member of the University of Arizona Engineering School Advisory Committee and the Boston University Center of Remote Sensing Advisory Council.

He received the B.Sc. ('68) in Physics from University of Grenoble, France; the Dipl. Ing. ('68) in Engineering from the Polytechnic Institute, Grenoble, and the M.Sc. ('69) and Ph.D. ('71) degrees in electrical sciences from the California Institute of Technology, Pasadena. He also has a M.Sc. ('83) degree in Geology from the University of California, Los Angeles, and an MBA ('79) from the University of Southern California, Los Angeles.

R. Neal Elliott

R. Neal Elliott

Associate Director for Research, American Council for an Energy-Efficient Economy (ACEEE)
Steering Committee, Industrial Generation

Neal Elliott coordinates ACEEE's overall research efforts. Dr. Elliott has also led the Industrial and Agricultural Programs since 1993. He is an internationally recognized expert and author on energy efficiency, energy efficiency programs and policies, motor systems, combined heat and power, analysis of energy efficiency and energy markets, and a frequent speaker at domestic and international conferences. Dr. Elliott also serves in an advisory capacity to industry, government, utilities, regulators and advocates on energy markets, policy and program design.

Dr. Elliott received BS and MS degrees in Mechanical Engineering from North Carolina State University, and was a Dean's Fellow and received a Ph.D. from Duke University. He is a registered Professional Engineer in North Carolina.

Katharine Gebbie

Photo of Dr. Katharine B. Gebbie

Acting Chief Scientist, National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST)
Speaker

Katharine B. Gebbie is NIST’s Acting Chief Scientist. Previously, she was Director of NIST’s Physics Laboratory, which supports industry by providing measurement services and research for electronic, optical and radiation technologies. Its focus is on atomic, molecular, optical and radiation physics, reflecting the continuing importance of these disciplines in developing new measurement technology.

She joined NIST in 1968 as a physicist in the Quantum Physics Division of JILA, a cooperative enterprise between NIST and the University of Colorado in Boulder. She has worked extensively on the physics of the solar and stellar atmospheres. Before being appointed Director of the newly formed Physics Laboratory in 1991, she served as Chief of the Quantum Physics Division and Acting Director of the Center or Atomic Molecular and Optical Physics. Dr. Gebbie is a Fellow of the American Physical Society, a Fellow of JILA, and a member of several professional societies including Sigma Xi and American Women in Science. She has received several awards, including the Department of Commerce Gold Medal and the WISE (Women in Science and Engineering) Lifetime Achievement Award.

Dr. Gebbie graduated from Bryn Mawr College with a B.A. degree in physics and subsequently earned a B.S. degree in astronomy and a Ph.D. in physics from University College London.

Bryan J. Hannegan

Bryan J. Hannegan

Vice President, Environment and Renewables, Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI)
Co-Chair, Speaker

Bryan Hannegan leads the teams responsible for EPRI's research into technologies and practices that enable cleaner and more efficient renewable power generation and reduce the environmental footprint associated with electric power generation, delivery, and use.

Prior to joining, Hannegan served in a dual capacity as the Chief of Staff for the White House Council on Environmental Quality (CEQ), and acting Special Assistant to the President for Economic Policy. During his tenure, he led the development of the President's Advanced Energy Initiative and assisted Federal agencies in their implementation of the Energy Policy Act of 2005 (EPACT 2005). At CEQ, Hannegan also coordinated Federal agency policies and activities on a wide range of environmental issues affecting air, water, land, and ecosystems. Between 1999 and 2003, Hannegan served as Staff Scientist for the U.S. Senate Committee on Energy and Natural Resources, where he handled energy efficiency, renewable energy, alternative fuels, and environmental aspects of energy production and use. He put together the first draft of what would become EPACT 2005, and was a principal staff member for action on energy and climate legislation during the 107th Congress.

A climate scientist, engineer, and energy policy expert, Hannegan holds a doctorate in earth system science, a Master of Science in engineering, both from the University of California - Irvine, and a Bachelor of Science in meteorology from the University of Oklahoma.

Eric Holdsworth

Director, Climate Change, Edison Electric Institute (EEI)
Steering Committee, Power Generation

Eric Holdsworth is a long-time veteran of the climate issue, having first worked on it in the early 1990’s. Currently, he is the Director of Climate Programs at EEI, where he helps oversee the Institute’s involvement in global climate change issues. In that capacity, he helps direct the development and execution of strategies to shape national climate policy consistent with EEI principles, including promoting clean energy and energy-efficient technologies.  He supports EEI’s CEO Climate Task Force, and helped organize an outreach campaign to advance EEI climate principles.  In addition, he oversees EEI’s involvement in state and regional climate efforts, as well as on greenhouse gas reporting and related standards, and manages EEI’s involvement in the international arena, including the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change negotiations and related processes. He has attended virtually all of the international climate negotiations since their inception.

Eric came to EEI following nine years at the Global Climate Coalition, an industry trade association, where he served as Associate Director.   

Eric holds a Masters in Business Administration, with a specialization in International Management, from the American Graduate School of International Management, also known as “Thunderbird.” He also holds a B.A. in International Affairs from the George Washington University, where he specialized in Latin America.

Ralph Keeling

Ralph Keeling

Ralph Keeling
Professor and Director of the Scripps CO2 program Scripps Institution of Oceanography, University of California San Diego
Steering Committee, Global Monitoring

Ralph is a climate scientist whose research interests include climate change, changes in atmospheric composition, ocean biogeochemistry, and carbon cycling.  He was the first to demonstrate that the oxygen concentration of the global atmosphere is decreasing due to the burning of fossil-fuels and has directed a program to track this decrease since 1989.  Since 2005 he has also directed the Scripps CO2 program which sustains the iconic record of carbon dioxide at Mauna Loa and other sites, begun by his father, Charles D. Keeling as well as time series of the stable isotopes and radiocarbon content of carbon dioxide.  He is engaged in ongoing research to refine estimates of sources and sinks of carbon dioxide and to detect climate impacts on the oceans using atmospheric measurements.  Ralph is an active participant in teaching and advising graduate students at the Scripps Institution of Oceanography at UC San Diego.

Ralph received a B.S. in physics from Yale University in 1979, and a Ph.D. in applied physics from Harvard University in 1988.  He has given keynote addresses to the American Geophysical Union in 2004, and to the G8 Legislators and Business Leaders Climate Change Forum in London in 2005.  In 1997, Dr. Keeling received the Rosenstiel Award in marine science for his work on atmospheric oxygen.  He was a contributing author to the 2001 and 2007 reports on the scientific basis of global warming by the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change. 

Daniel Kreeger

Daniel Kreeger

Executive Director, Association of Climate Change Officers
Breakout Session Co-chair, Verification and Carbon Market Emissions Issues

Daniel Kreeger is co-founder and executive director of the Association of Climate Change Officers, a professional development society for executives in the public and private sectors whose responsibilities include developing and directing climate change strategies. While leading the association, he has created a forum that enables the exchange and enhancement of best practices, industry standards, and innovation in the area of climate change strategies. He has focused on educating industry and government on the importance of developing sound organizational structures and change management programs, and establishing incentives to encourage innovation and successful response to climate change considerations.

Prior to co-founding ACCO, Mr. Kreeger worked on crisis and issues management for companies in Florida focused on environmental matters, founded an online communications consultancy, and worked in the Department of Defense on military health system matters. He is an accomplished business professional with cross-functional experience in business development, marketing, public relations, public affairs, research, and consulting within business-to-business, government, and consumer-centric sectors. He has significant experience working on the business impacts of climate change, renewable energy, and related environmental issues and is a frequent writer and speaker on these topics.

David Lunsford

David Lunsford

Policy Leader, Emissions Trading, International Emissions Trading Association (IETA)
Speaker, International Perspectives and Breakout Session Co-chair, Verification and Carbon Market Emissions Issues

David Lunsford works in Geneva on greenhouse gas trading policy for IETA. He also analyzes the global growth in carbon capture and storage development and deployment, focusing on its recognition in emissions trading systems. In his current role, David interacts with governments and the private sector on varying levels, encouraging climate change strategies that make sense for business and policymakers alike. He has several years of experience in the capital markets, including as an investment analyst, and possesses an MBA focusing on International Organizations from the University of Geneva.

Molly K. Macauley

Molly K. Macauley

Research Director and Senior Fellow, Resources for the Future
Speaker, Challenges for Forestry Offsets

Molly Molly Macauley serves as Director of Research and Senior Fellow at RFF. Her research interests include space economics and policy, the economics of new technologies, recycling and solid waste management, climate policy, and the use of economic incentives in environmental regulation. She has been a Visiting Professor, Johns Hopkins University Department of Economics, and Princeton University's Woodrow Wilson School of Public Affairs. Earlier in her career, she was a policy analyst for Communications Satellite Corporation.

She serves on a number of boards, currently including the National Research Council/National Academy of Sciences Space Studies Board, and the American Astronautical Society Board of Directors.

Dr. Macauley holds a Ph.D. and M.A. in economics from Johns Hopkins University and a B.A. in economics from the College of William and Mary.

Robert C. Marlay

Robert C. Marlay

Deputy Director, Climate Change Technology Program, U.S. Department of Energy (DOE CCTP)
Steering Committee, Carbon Markets

Dr. Bob Marlay is the Deputy Director of the DOE’S Climate Change Technology Program. He is a career member of the government's Senior Executive Service and serves concurrently as Deputy Director of the Office of Climate Change Policy and Technology (CCPT) in the DOE Office of Policy and International. He has more than 30 years of Federal Service and has been with the DOE and its predecessor agencies since 1974. His contributions have focused primarily in the areas of national security, energy policy, science policy, and management of research and development programs.
Earlier, Dr. Marlay served as Director of DOE's Office of Science and Technology Policy. He has also held leadership positions in the Offices of Science, Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, and in the Federal Energy Administration.
He holds a B.S.E. degree from Duke University, as well as two Masters degrees and a Ph.D. from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. He is a licensed Professional Engineer in the District of Columbia.

Brian J. McLean

Director, Office of Atmospheric Programs, Office of Air and Radiation, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency
Speaker, Government Perspectives

Brian McLean’s office is responsible for designing and implementing emissions “cap and trade” programs, such as the Acid Rain Program and the Clean Air Interstate Rule; for implementing the Stratospheric Ozone Protection Program under the Montreal Protocol; for developing and operating EPA’s voluntary climate protection programs, such as Energy Star and Methane-to-Markets; and for analyzing climate legislation, developing the first national greenhouse gas reporting regulation, and supporting domestic and international climate policy development. 

Previously, Dr. McLean served as the Director of the Clean Air Markets Division, which develops and manages national and regional emissions reduction programs.  He was a key contributor to the development of Title IV of the 1990 Clean Air Act (The Acid Rain Program) and the U.S.-Canada Air Quality Accord, and has worked with several other countries on acid rain and climate change.

Dr. McLean holds a Bachelor’s degree in Electrical Engineering from Lafayette College, a Master’s degree in City and Regional Planning from Rutgers University, and a Doctorate in City Planning from the University of Pennsylvania.

John Miranowski

John Miranowski

Professor, Iowa State University
Steering Committee and Session Chair, Distributed Sources

Dr. Miranaowski is Professor, and former Department Chair, of the Department of Economics, Iowa State University. His research interests include natural resources, agricultural and environmental policy. He has also served at USDA as Director, Resources and Technology Division, Economic Research Service, Executive Coordinator of the Secretary’s Policy Coordination Council, and Special Assistant to the Deputy Secretary. He was awarded the USDA Distinguished Service Honor Award for Biofuels Program Development and USDA Superior Service Honor Award to Division for Workforce Diversity.

He holds a PhD and AM from, Harvard University, and a BS from Iowa State University.

Karen Obenshain

Director, Fuels, Technology & Commercial Policy, Edison Electric Institute
Steering Committee, Speaker

Dr. Obenshain’s primary responsibilities at EEI—the trade association for the shareholder-owned electric utilities—include power generation fuels, in particular, coal, and innovative technologies, especially those that may address global climate change concerns. Prior to joining EEI, Dr. Obenshain worked as a Staff Scientist with a regulatory law firm in DC, as a risk assessor on Department of Energy nuclear weapons facilities contracts, as a university administrator and as a petroleum geologist. Dr. Obenshain holds a Master of Science degree in Geology from the University of Georgia and a Doctor of Science degree in Environmental Health Sciences from Tulane School of Public Health and Tropical Medicine.

Ray Ratheal

Ray Ratheal

Director, Feedstocks & Energy Procurement, Energy & Climate Change Policy, Global Chemical & Energy Procurement, Eastman Chemical Company Speaker, Industrial Generation

Ray began his Eastman career in 1977 at the Longview, Texas, site.  He has held management positions in the areas of Operations, Capital Projects, Supply Chain and Procurement.  Ray has been in his current position as Director of Feedstock & Energy Procurement and Energy and Climate Change Policy since 2002. He received his B.S. degree in Chemical Engineering from the University of Arizona and completed the Executive Development Program at Texas A&M.  Ray serves on several trade association committees, including the American Chemistry Council Energy Committee and the Industrial Energy Consumers of America (Chairman).

Ed Rightor

Ed Rightor

Director, Greenhouse Gas Control Technology, Environmental Technology Center, The Dow Chemical Company
Steering Committee, Industrial Generation

In his current role, Ed Rightor has characterized Dow’s GHG footprint and is active in working with businesses to reduce their footprint through a variety of opportunities including energy efficiency, use of CO2, and carbon mitigation. He has helped lead efforts to put CO2 to work where possible, including in enhanced oil recovery projects in Canada and Louisiana. 

In earlier roles, he was the Director of New Business Development for the Oil and Gas Market Facing Business, a Six Sigma black belt leading process improvement efforts for businesses, and a leader in development of advanced technologies for the study of materials. He received the Shirley award from the Advanced Light Source (Berkeley, CA) for leading development of x-ray microscopy for the study of polymers and other industrial materials.

Dr. Rightor holds a Ph.D. in Chemistry from Michigan State University and a B.S. from Marietta College. 

Maxine Savitz

Maxine Savitz

Vice President, National Academy of Engineering
Co-Chair

Dr. Savitz served in the capacity of Deputy Assistant Secretary for Conservation for the DOE from 1979 – 1983. She was President of the Lighting Research Institute from 1983-1985, and a member of the California Council on Science and Technology, from 1997-2000, where she is currently a Fellow. Dr. Savitz retired as the General Manager for Technology Partnerships at Honeywell, Inc. During her career at Honeywell, she oversaw the development and manufacturing of innovative materials for the aerospace, transportation, and industrial sectors. She is currently a member of Advisory Boards at Sandia, Pacific Northwest, and Oak Ridge National Laboratories. Dr. Savitz was elected to serve a four-year term as the National Academy of Engineering’s Vice-President in 2006. She is Director of The Advisory Group, a management-consulting firm located in Washington, DC, where she advises on research and development management, energy and environmental policy, materials development, production and utilization, and technology transfer. Dr. Savitz holds a Ph.D. from MIT.

Daniel Schrag

Daniel Schrag

Professor and Director, Center for the Environment, Harvard University
Steering Committee and Session Chair, Distributed Sources

Professor Schrag studies climate and climate change over the broadest range of Earth history. He has examined changes in ocean circulation over the last several decades, with particular attention to El Niño and the tropical Pacific. He has worked on theories for Pleistocene ice-age cycles including a better determination of ocean temperatures during the Last Glacial Maximum, 20,000 years ago. He also helped develop the Snowball Earth hypothesis, proposing that a series of global glaciations occurred between 750 and 580 million years ago that may have led to the evolution of multicellular animals. Currently he is working with economists and engineers on technological approaches to mitigating future climate change.

He holds a Ph.D. in geology from the University of California at Berkeley and a B.S. (geology and geophysics, political science) from Yale University.

Quinlan J. Shea, III

Executive Director, Environment, At The Edison Electric Institute
Co-Chair

Quin Shea joined EEI in September of 1999, and heads the department which has responsibility for managing all environmental issues, including analysis and advocacy. Mr. Shea's career commenced with over four years of public service at the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, where he served both in the legislative counsel's office and enforcement program. Nine years in the mining industry followed, culminating at the National Mining Association in the position of Vice President for Environmental Policy. His interest in the environmental field began while still in law school, with clerkships at the U.S. Department of Justice's Lands and Natural Resources Division.

Mr. Shea holds a law degree from Washington & Lee University, and B.A.s in history as well as political science from Western Maryland College. He writes extensively on environmental issues, and often addresses governmental, industry and academic groups.

Pieter Tans

Pieter Tans

Senior Scientist, Earth System Research Laboratory, National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration
Speaker, The Pacala Report

Dr. Pieter Tans has researched the global carbon cycle for several decades, starting with his Ph.D. dissertation research in the Netherlands, and has published about 100 scientific papers on the subject. His group maintains the world's largest global monitoring network of atmospheric greenhouse gas concentrations. Isotopic ratios of several of the greenhouse gases are also measured. From these data temporal trends and large-scale spatial patterns are derived of the sources and sinks of greenhouse gases such as carbon dioxide and methane. The latter effort requires the use of atmospheric and chemical circulation models.

Dr. Tans has served on the Committee on Oceanic Carbon and the Panel on Climate Variability on Decade to Century Time Scales, of the National Research Council. He is also a member of the interagency Carbon and Climate Working Group, associate editor of the Journal of Climate, and a member of the editorial board of Tellus.

He earned his doctorate in physics from Rijkusuniversiteit Groningen, The Netherlands.

Gray E. Taylor

Gray E. Taylor

Partner, Corporate, Bennett Jones LLP
Speaker, Carbon Trading Issues

Gray Taylor is co-leader of the Bennett Jones’ climate change and emission trading practice affecting businesses in Canada and abroad. Gray focuses on emissions trading transactions involving Emission Reduction Purchase Agreements and related financing and transactional documents for a broad range of Kyoto Protocol (CDM and JI), Alberta and other Canadian regulatory deals as well as North American and international voluntary carbon deals. He also advises on corporate governance and climate change business planning issues. Gray has acted on a number of complex transactions, such as representing the largest private sector participants in the World Bank US$1-billion Umbrella Carbon Fund transaction, and creating unique structures to facilitate participation by diverse entities in emission trading markets, including Natsource's Greenhouse Gas Credit Aggregation Buyers Pool and innovative arrangements related to voluntary environmental credit creation and trading.

Gray acted on commercial arrangements and transactions in Canada, the U.S., and elsewhere in the world for over a decade and a half before turning to climate change and environmental issues. As a result, he brings an understanding of business realities, practices, and goals to his climate change and emission trading practice.

Gray is a past chair of the National Environmental, Energy and Resources Law Section of the Canadian Bar Association (CBA) and is recognized in Chambers Global and Lexpert. He is qualified to practice in New York. He holds JD and MEd degrees from the University of Toronto.

Ray F. Weiss

Ray F. Weiss

Distinguished Professor of Geochemistry and Associate Dean for Academic Affairs, Scripps Institution of Oceanography, University of California, San Diego
Steering Committee and Speaker, Global Monitoring

Ray Weiss’s career has been devoted to the use of chemical and isotopic measurements to the study of natural processes in the oceans, lakes and the atmosphere. He has authored or co-authored 137 research papers appearing in the international peer-reviewed scientific literature. Among his major research contributions are the first experimental proof of the existence of deep-sea hydrothermal vents; the practical application of the measurement of dissolved atmospheric chlorofluorocarbons to determine the rates of ventilation, transport and mixing processes in the deep ocean and in deep lakes; the first geochemical study of mixing processes in the Weddell Sea, a major source of deep water for the world oceans; the discovery and characterization of the global distribution and increase in atmospheric nitrous oxide, a stratospheric ozone depleter and a greenhouse gas regulated by both the Montreal and Kyoto protocols; and the first accurate calibration of the global abundance and variations of the atmospheric hydroxyl radical, the atmosphere’s primary cleansing agent.

Professor Weiss is an elected Fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science, and of the American Geophysical Union. He has served on numerous national and international scientific planning and steering committees, and on the editorial boards of a number of prominent journals in the oceanic and atmospheric sciences. He has also been active in the international scientific assessment processes of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) and the Scientific Assessment of Ozone Depletion reports of the World Meteorological Organization and the United Nations Environment Programme. Professor Weiss is the lead principal investigator responsible for the measurement component of the Advanced Global Atmospheric Gases Experiment (AGAGE), an international effort to trace and model the emissions, global distributions, and atmospheric lifetimes of a wide range of anthropogenic and natural greenhouse gases and ozone depleting substances.

Dr. Weis received a bachelor's degree in chemistry from the California Institute of Technology and earned master’s and PhD degrees in earth sciences from Scripps.

Brad Upton

Photo of Brad Upton

Project Leader, National Council for Air and Stream Improvement (NCASI)
Steering Committee

Brad Upton has been with NCASI since 1996. Brad’s primary responsibilities are in the area of climate change research. He has been involved in the development of carbon footprint methodologies and protocols for estimating greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions from forest products manufacturing facilities (pulp and paper mills and wood products plants) for use in various GHG reporting programs. He has also worked on tools to characterize biomass carbon stored in forest products in use and to characterize the GHG attributes of wood versus alternative building materials.

Dr. Upton has degrees in chemical engineering from Auburn University (Ph.D. and M.S.) and Mississippi State University (B.S.).

Diane Wittenberg

Photo of Diane Wittenberg

Executive Director, The Climate Registry
Speaker, Challenges and Opportunities In Calculating, Verifying, and Reporting GHG Emissions

As Executive Director, Diane ensures that the organization’s procedures and protocols result in valid and defensible data to support the goal of addressing climate change concerns.

Prior to becoming Executive Director of The Climate Registry, Diane spent six years as President of the California Climate Action Registry. Previously, she spent 15 years with Edison International, where she played a key role in launching new businesses, including Edison EV (President), Edison Utility Alliances (President) and Edison Technology Solutions (Vice President, Business Development and Marketing). She also served as Vice President for Corporate Communications for Edison International and was internationally recognized for her efforts to launch an electric vehicle industry. She has also served as Vice President of a public relations firm.

Diane has been honored by the Coalition for Clean Air, which presented her with the Clean Air Citizen Award. She also is a past or present board member of EV Global Motors Company, a Lee Iacocca enterprise; TransMagnetics, a brushless motor manufacturer; Women’s Leadership Board, Kennedy School of Government; Thunderbird, the American Graduate School of International Management; L.A. Women’s Foundation; and Partners in Care Foundation.

Hector Ybanez

Hector Ybanez

Corporate Manager, Environmental, Holcim (US) Inc.
Steering Committee, Industrial Generation

Hector Ybanez’ research has included the development and application of numerical methods to describe adsorption, desorption, kinetic reactions, and root growth as influenced by fertilizer placement methods. Additionally, he has 20 years of environmental management experience, his primary responsibilities include multi-facility operations in the United States, Canada, and Puerto Rico in the area of regulatory development, NESHAP, NSR/PSD compliance and permitting, cap and trade programs, and other air and hazardous waste related issues.

Mr. Ybanez has a M.S. in Soil Chemistry from South Dakota State University and a B.S. in Agronomy - Soil Science from Texas A&M University.